Lesson 4: Teaching Food in Preschool Spanish

Lesson 4: Teaching Food in Preschool Spanish

Inside: A preschool lesson on teaching food in Spanish, through comprehensible stories, songs, and input for kids.

Lesson 4 Goals: I can recognize the names of several familiar foods.

Target Structures: tiene hambre, come, toma, la manzana, la leche, el maíz, el pan, el agua

Click here to see the week-by-week listing, and to access my overall unit plans. (Each lesson provides enough material for multiple classes.)

Review: Sings the songs learned so far, ¿Cómo te llamas? ball chant, Los animales Bingo.

Movement/brain breaks: Stretch with our movement words: levántate, siéntate, manos arriba, and manos abajo, corre and salta, Duck, Duck, Goose in Spanish, or ¡Salta, salta!

Lesson 4: Teaching Food in Spanish for Kids

Activity 1

Introduce la manzana, la leche, el pan, and el agua. It’s best to use real objects or toys if possible, when introducing new words. Practice saying each a few times, and circle them a bit (¿Es una manzana? ¡No! ¿Es agua? ¡Sí!)

Have cutouts of la manzana, la leche, el pan, and el agua ready for everyone (included in a Unit 2 purchase). Pass them out, and practice following directions using the props. Say, come el pan; they search for the the right picture, and pretend to eat it.

Preschool Spanish lesson for la comida

Activity 2

Tell the story El caballo que tiene hambre, available below. The term uvas is included, and will show up later throughout the unit. You shouldn’t need to define, however, as the students will understand the word from the pictures.

 

Activity 3

Vote on favorite foods and make a graph. I prepared little cards with names ahead of time, since we’ll repeat this activity, but post-its would work as well. This is a fun way to get in lots of repetition of the food names as you ask and point to the pictures.

copy-of-www-spanishmama-com1

Activity 4

Play ¿Qué hay en la bolsa? again, from Lesson 3. Have bags ready with toy foods inside, or sneak foods into one bag for each turn. Sit in a circle, and the kids take turns getting a bag. They have to put their hand in the bag and guess what food is inside just by feeling it. Once they guess the food, we talk about it. ¿Te gusta el maíz? ¿El perro come el maíz? etc.

 

Supplemental la comida activities and resources for home or class:

A song to learn basic terms for food in Spanish:

More terms for la comida, going through the meals of the day:

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Preschool Spanish Unit

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teaching food in spanish

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How to teach Spanish with Authentic Songs

How to teach Spanish with Authentic Songs

Inside: How to teach Spanish with authentic music, in the middle and high school classroom.

 

I didn’t know how to teach Spanish with authentic music, as a new teacher. Fresh from living in Peru and head over heels for the language and culture, I sat down with the textbook. Apparently, for the first half of Spanish I, we would learn classroom objects, articles, greetings, and regular verbs. Hmm. How did authentic songs with irregular verbs and  fit in?

I tried out some of my favorite music in class anyway, but it kind of bombed. We were listening to noise. Extremely catchy noise, but nothing comprehensible. I reverted to grammar songs and conjugation jingles. They were cute, but I was feeding my students the parts: hoping one day all the pieces would come together into the whole language I wanted them to acquire.

Then I finally got that I needed to start with whole, intact, understandable language. Real-life communication is the goal, and songs became more accessible because we were learning high-frequency verbs right away. I saw how comprehensible input and authentic resources could work together. My students could acquire authentic language and real-life skills like getting the gist of a text and picking familiar words out from unfamiliar word. My job was to introduce songs with the language we needed, and find a way to make it comprehensible.

So, here’s what I wish someone had told me as a newbie teacher:

 

1. Think through the goal.

 

How will the song connect to your current targets? Will it be a cultural connection? Are you looking to highlight a pattern (present progressive, ir + a, etc.)? Do you want to focus on certain phrases or vocabulary? Here are some huge lists of authentic Spanish songs I came up with for Spanish 1, Spanish 2, and Spanish 2.

 

2. Think about how much of the song can be comprehensible.

 

How much of the song can you use? I used to get stuck because I didn’t know how to use a song that used many words we didn’t know, or grammar we hadn’t learned. I really think that songs are the best way to hook students to content just above their proficiency level. You can, of course, explain the entire song or provide a translation.

– Some authentic songs can be 100% comprehensible, if you work through them a bit. Very simple songs-perhaps children’s songs- are a great way to see how language works as a whole.

– Some are best because they repeat key phrases. Your students might not understand everything, but esto no me gusta and te estaba buscando get repeated a bazillion times and they never forget those phrases. If you are using a grammar-based approach, this is a good way to help set patterns; if you are CI-based, it helps to cement target structures from a different context.

– For other songs, the verses aren’t the focus, but the chorus can be understand and remembered. Voy a reír, voy a bailar, vivir mi vida, lalala…  The chorus is what your students will walk away singing anyway, so in this situation zero in all of your activities on that part.

 

How to teach Spanish with authentic songs

 

3. Plan how you’ll make the song comprehensible.

 

How can you bridge the gap from what your students know, to the song? There’s a whole lot more out there than what I’ve done in class, but here are some ideas. This will of course depend on how much of the song you plan to use and teach.

-Pre-teach important vocabulary/phrases.

– Listen to the song and project the lyrics onto the board. Focus on the parts you want them to know, and summarize the parts in between so they get the gist of the lyrics. Circle the phrases you want to emphasize, asking personalized questions to the students. In La bicicleta, for example, Shakira says, puedo ser feliz… I pause there, and we discuss. Students might fill in the blank for themselves (puedo ser feliz… tomando café, sin tarea, etc.) I don’t pause and translate/discuss every line, as that would kill the enjoyment. We will listen to the songs many times, so there is plenty of time to study different parts.

– Create an embedded reading to scaffold the text of the song.

– Watch the music video if it’s appropriate (preview, preview preview…  I speak from experience!), and pause to discuss. Use language the students know to discuss what’s happening and to help them interpret the lyrics.

I think songs are one of the best uses of authentic resources. While most of the time I want class to be comprehensible, music is a good way to get students to take risks and try to derive meaning from something above their level.

 

4. Create some activities to work through the song.

 

– Try Draw, Write, Check: have your students divide a piece of paper into 4 or 6  parts. Give them a phrase to draw for each part. Then, play the song. Each time they hear the phrase they drew, make a tally mark and check numbers after the song.

– Do an old-fashoined cloze activity.

– Type up the lyrics on the left side of a paper, and have students summarize each section on the right.

– Ask several questions (Is the singer sad? What does he wish would happen?) Give the students markers to highlight and color code the lyrics that give evidence for the answers.

– Change the voice of the singer from third to first person, or vice-versa.

– Make up actions and sing along!

 

If you’re looking for an easy activity packet to teach with authentic songs, you may want to check out my bundle:

 

 

 

More ideas from other teachers on how to teach with authentic music:

 

¡La música! from Kristy Placido

What can I DO {-re-mi-fa-so-la-ti-da} with a song?

– Create a PPT with screenshots of the music video, a la MovieTalk like in this example from Kristy Placido

Música miércoles for using Spanish songs weekly from Mis Clases Locas

 

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Lesson 3: Farm Animals in Preschool Spanish

Lesson 3: Farm Animals in Preschool Spanish

Inside: A preschool lesson on farm animals in Spanish, with comprehensible input, stories, and songs, for kids.

Lesson 3 Goals: I can name some farm animals.

Target Structures: dice, el caballo, el perro, el gato, la gallina, el cerdo, el pato

Review: Review the ¿Cómo te llamas? ball chant from Lesson 2, and sings the songs. Play Los animales Bingo.

Click to see my outline of Preschool Spanish Lessons for Los pollitos dicen. (Each lesson provides enough material for multiple classes.)

 

Lesson 3: Farm Animals in Spanish

Activity 1

The farm animals have already been introduced from Lesson 2, though always with visuals and in the context of dice. Here in Lesson 3, we’ll zero in on the animals themselves. If you landed on this page just looking for activities for farm animals in Spanish, be sure to look over Lesson 2 as well.

Play Los animales Bingo (included in the free download for Unit 1.) You can call out the animal’s names, or say “La vaca dice mu”, etc.

Activity 2

Do ¿Qué hay en la bolsa? Have a bag ready with toy farm animals inside. We sit in a circle, and the kids take turns getting a bag. They have to put their hand in the bag and guess what animal is inside just by feeling it. Once they guess the animal, we talk about it. I circle dice and the animal names each time:

 – ¿Es un caballo? ¡No! ¿Es un pollito? ¡Sí! ¿El pollito dice <muu>? ¡No! ¿El pollito dice <pío>? ¡Sí!, etc.

(Some of the students can’t name the animals yet, even though they are eager for turns. I don’t worry about output yet– the whole activity is designed as a way to catch their attention and get more input.)

5

 

Activity 3

Play Duck, Duck, Goose as Pato, pato, pollito. It’s tricky to get the hang of it with little ones, but this has been a big hit in my little class.

Once everyone can play, save this one for a brain break during the rest of the year.

Activity 4

Use the animals videos embedded below for MovieTalks. Show the video and mute the sound or pause the video here and there. Describe and talk about what is happening using words and questions the students know. ¿Es una vaca? ¿Cómo se llama? ¿El gato corre o salta?

The kids can also watch these videos at home, and see what language they can understand. As the class progresses through each unit, they’ll comprehend more and more of these videos.

Activity 5

Color and read the mini-book ¿Cómo dicen los animales? This mini-book gets in lots of dice repetitions, and can be sent home for extra reinforcement.

Los animales de la granja free mini-book

 

Supplemental Farm Animal Activities and Resources:

This song from Calico Spanish is grea. In this version, they say “hace” instead of “dice”– I believe that’s how it is in Spain:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXr6QTZKPuA
This song from Calico Spanish is grea. In this version, they say “hace” instead of “dice”– I believe that’s how it is in Spain:

El caballo:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjo8snD0umA&t=195s
El gallo y la gallina:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltQg4HJJMSE
El gato:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LcDavMLNTec&t=1s
El perro:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euUJS5Bkat8
La vaca:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W62JfAKL3to&t=5s

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If you like this lesson, click to download the whole unit! You’ll get games, printables, mini-books, and more!
Los pollitos dicen
Play Bingo with pictures of the foods. To keep the language as “whole” as possible, I call out the terms as Me gusta el helado. Me gustan las uvas. If the words are very new, show a picture as you call out the term.

Find Your Blob: A Fun Brain Break for Spanish Class

Find Your Blob: A Fun Brain Break for Spanish Class

Inside: A fun brain break in Spanish for the language classroom.

I’m working hard this year to make sure I break up our classes with some sort of movement. I came up with Find Your Blob for something that’s quick and ties into the lesson. The students are speaking the TL, but because it’s related to their opinions and preferences, they get into it. (It’s also LOW-PRESSURE. I don’t consider it a brain break if an activity creates anxiety for the participants!)

How to Do “Find Your Blob”

The idea is simple: Come up with a question related to the content you’re working on. ¿Qué te gusta hacer?, for example.

Then, list or brainstorm 4-6 answers (depends on your class size). Me gusta: correr, dormir, leer, viajar, etc. The students silently pick their answer. 

When I say so, everyone stands up and walks around asking the question. If the answers match, those students stick together. Then those two look for more people. Everyone with the same answer has to be in the same blob (or group of people), until the whole room is sorted into four blobs.

That’s it! I like to erase the two most popular answers, and replace them, so everyone has to mix it up again. Most everyone in Spanish 1 this morning, for example, chose cansado in response to ¿Cómo estás? So we erased that, and added in more creative options. Once they get the hang of it, you can add in things like ¡Yo también! or ¡A mí también! 

If the groups are interesting (perhaps one person is alone, or one group is huge), it can make for some fun conversation and helps you get to know your students. I ask what the groups represent, which could bring in ¿Qué les gusta hacer?, and then Nos gusta… I’ve really liked this because the language is organic and memorable. Sometimes we do two or three rounds of responses, and then sit down, ready to work again.

You can do this with anything– any tense, any topic. Some more ideas:

If you could be any _________, what would you be?
If you could have a superpower, what would it be?
What would you like to do this weekend?
What’s your favorite _______?
You’re going on vacation. Where are you going?
Which book would you like to live in?
If you had to wear one outfit the rest of your life, what would it be?

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Find You Blob, a Fun Speaking Activity for the World Language Classroom

Lesson 2: Dice and Me llamo Lesson for Preschool Spanish

Lesson 2: Dice and Me llamo Lesson for Preschool Spanish

Inside: Activities for a ¿Cómo te llamas? and me llamo lesson for preschool Spanish classes. 

 

Lesson 2 Goals: I can say my name. I can recognize some animals by name. 

Target Structures: ¿Cómo te llamas? Me llamo…, dice

(Los animales de la granja are introduced this lesson. At this point, the goal is just to recognize their names, not necessarily name them like in Lesson 3. They’re mainly here to learn dice.)

Click to see my outline of Preschool Spanish Lessons for Los pollitos dicen. (Each lesson provides enough material for multiple classes.)

Movement/brain breaks: Stretch with movement words: levántate, siéntate, manos arriba, and manos abajo, corre, and salte, Duck, Duck, Goose in Spanish, or ¡Salta, salta!

 

 

¿CÓMO TE LLAMAS? & ME LLAMO LESSON FOR PRESCHOOL

 

ACTIVITY 3

 

Introduce ¿Cómo te llamas? and Me llamo. Model for a bit (the pollito puppet from the last lesson works well to act this out.) For example:

Teacher: – ¡Buenos días!
Pollito: – ¡Buenos días!

Pollito: – ¿Cómo te llamas?
Teacher: – Me llamo…

Then, ask the kids their names. The video below, from Mundo de Pepit, is really helpful in seeing how to this sort of modeling and interacting with the students. 

 

ACTIVITY 3

 

Review Los pollitos dicen and sing using the pollito puppets. Circle dice again: ¿El pollito dice: <muu>? ¡No! ¿El elefante dice: <pío>? ¡No! ¿El pollito dice: <pío>? ¡Sí! etc. Introduce more farm animas with these farm-animals-printouts and circle those. ¿El caballo dice: <pío pío>? ¡No! ¿El caballo dice: <nii>? ¡Sí! 

4

ACTIVITY 2

 

Have the students sit in a circle, and pass a ball. While passing the ball, chant, ¿Có-mo te lla-mas, có-mo te lla-mas, có-mo te lla-mas TÚ? Whoever has the ball on tú answers: Me llamo ______.  It’s okay if they only say their name right now. Usually the kids clamor for a turn, but if the ball lands on someone shy, they can pass it to a neighbor. No need to force output!

I often use this chant as a warm-up for circle time as we start class. 

 

ACTIVITY 4

 

Play ¿Qué hay en la bolsa? again, from Lesson 3. Have bags ready with toy foods inside, or sneak foods into one bag for each turn. Sit in a circle, and the kids take turns getting a bag. They have to put their hand in the bag and guess what food is inside just by feeling it. Once they guess the food, we talk about it. ¿Te gusta el maíz? ¿El perro come el maíz? etc.

 

SUPPLEMENTAL ME LLAMO RESOURCES FOR HOME OR CLASS:

 

 

 

 

  

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Los pollitos dicen

Lesson 1: Greetings Activities for Preschool Spanish

Lesson 1: Greetings Activities for Preschool Spanish

Inside: Greetings activities in preschool Spanish, through a ¿Cómo te llamas? and me llamo lesson.


Lesson 1 Goals:
I can greet my teacher and friends.

Target Structuresbuenos días, ¿Cómo estás?, Muy bien, gracias, el pollito, and dice.

Click to see my outline of Preschool Spanish Lessons for Los pollitos dicen. (Each lesson provides enough material for multiple classes.)

Movement/brain breaks: Stretch with our movement words: levántate, siéntate, manos arriba, and manos abajo.

 

SPANISH GREETINGS LESSON FOR PRESCHOOL

 

ACTIVITY 1

 

Teach the song Buenos días. This will be a good way to start future classes, and you can teach the whole song, or just focus on the buenos días line.

 

As you learn the song, do motions for each part (stretching in the morning, hands up, questioning, for how are you, thumbs up, and pointing to a friend for usted).

 

ACTIVITY 3

 

Now that greetings are underway, teach the first line to Los pollitos: Los pollitos dicen pío, pío, pío. Show the chick puppet (free printable) to teach el pollito, and move the mouth for pío, pío.

Circle both pollito and dice. ¿El pollito dice <muu>? ¡No! ¿El elefante dice <pío>? ¡No! ¿El pollito dice <pío? ¡Sí! etc. Once the kids feel comfortable with that phrase, give them their own little chick, and practice singing the first line several times.

This will come in handy when we do ¿Cómo te llamas?  next lesson!

ACTIVITY 2

 

Teach buenos días, buenas tardes, and buenas noches with the picture cards from Unit 1 (free download below!). The morning, afternoon, and night picture cards can be given to each student, or just used by the teacher. It could be a special student job to hold them while singing the greeting song, as well.

You could also have the students color the cards and then hold them up as you say “buenas días” or “buenas noches.”

Buenos días greeting cards for preschool Spanish lesson

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL ME GUSTA RESOURCES FOR HOME OR CLASS:

 

 

 

 

 

Want More?

If you like this lesson, click to purchase the whole unit! You’ll get games, printables, mini-books, and more!

Los pollitos dicen

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