Printable Spanish-Speaking Countries and Capitals Game Cards

Printable Spanish-Speaking Countries and Capitals Game Cards

Inside: Spanish-speaking countries and capitals map and game cards.

It’s Hispanic Heritage Month, a perfect time to introduce geography for Spanish-speaking countries. I’ve made a map and set of cards that teach countries, capitals, maps, and country shapes, as well as a few quick facts about each country. In this free download, you can also find directions for games like Go Fish, Concentration, and Slap-it. A color set is in included, as well as black and white in case you want your kids/students to color in the flags themselves.

Spanish-speaking Countries and Capitals Map and Game Cards

Though I like to use games to introduce lists like this, remember that memorizing a list won’t necessarily produce students who love culture. If my students are really going to connect to far away places, they needs stories, videos, food, and songs (and of course travel, if possible) to produce real affection. Hopefully these fun games will help you painlessly and quickly introduce geography, so that when you do listen to a Colombian artist or watch a clip from Puerto Rico, everyone knows the context.

 

These links are helpful for remembering and connecting to Spanish-speaking countries:

 

Simple repetition for names/capitals, while showing map:

 

 

For older students (the original video is cool, but on the line for school-appropriate):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hispanic artists by country:

 

http://musicaenespanol.weebly.com/

 

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Printable card games for Spanish-speaking countries and capitals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hispanic Heritage Month Series 2016 | Multicultural Kid Blogs We are so excited for our FIFTH annual Hispanic Heritage Month series!

 

 

 

September 14
Hanna Cheda on Multicultural Kid Blogs: How to Pass on Hispanic Heritage as an Expat

 

 

 

September 15
Spanish Mama: Los Pollitos Dicen Printable Puppets

 

 

 

September 16
Hispanic Mama: Children’s Shows that Kids in Latin America Grew Up With

 

 

 

September 19
Spanish Playground: Authentic Hispanic Heritage Month Games Everyone Can Play

 

 

 

September 20
Tiny Tapping Toes: Exploring Instruments for Hispanic Heritage Month

 

 

 

September 21
Kid World Citizen on Multicultural Kid Blogs

 

 

 

September 22
Spanish Mama

 

 

 

September 23
All Done Monkey

 

 

 

September 26
Crafty Moms Share

 

 

 

September 27
Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes

 

 

 

September 28
La Clase de Sra. DuFault

 

 

 

September 29
Embracing Diversity

 

 

 

September 30
Mama Tortuga

 

 

 

October 3
Hispanic Mama on Multicultural Kid Blogs

 

 

 

October 4
La Clase de Sra. DuFault

 

 

 

October 5
Pura Vida Moms

 

 

 

October 7
Spanglish House

 

 

 

October 10
Mundo Lanugo

 

 

 

October 11
Kid World Citizen

 

 

 

October 12
MommyMaestra

 

 

 

October 13
inspired by familia

 

 

 

October 14
El Mundo de Pepita on Multicultural Kid Blogs

 

 

 

Don’t miss all of the great posts from previous years as well: 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015

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10 Interactive End-of-the-Year Games for the Spanish Classroom

10 Interactive End-of-the-Year Games for the Spanish Classroom

Inside: End of the year games for Spanish class.

The end of the year can be… interesting, right? Everyone is tired, you have run out of ideas, testing has already been done, and summer is on everyone’s mind. Here are some ideas that work with any unit or theme and put all the summer energy to constructive use. (And don’t miss my post on Icebreakers for High School and Middle School.)

If you have a few weeks that need some fresh content, the BBC’s beginner’s Spanish series Mi Vida Loca is also a great option. Most of the ideas below are gathered from my series on Games and Ideas for Mi Vida Loca. I have free activities from Episodes 1-5 available, and an entire Activity Pack available as well.

1

1. Serpiente 

Divide the class into two groups. Write a word on the board, and draw a slash after it. The first team has to write a word that starts with the last letter written, then draw a slash. The second team writes word starting with the last letter of that word, and so on. No words may be repeated, and you can adjust the rules for what words are allowed (ie, they must contain at least 3 letters).

2. 20 Preguntas 

Play Veinte Preguntas to review people, places, and words from the series. (Give the students some basic structures and phrases if necessary: ¿Es una persona? ¿Es un lugar? ¿Es una cosa?)

3. Bracket Activity

Do a bracket tournament and vote on any topic. It could be food, songs you learned this year, etc. Use my March Madness bracket PPT here to project a bracket on the board and list the items. Designate one wall for the upper choice and one for the lower choice. Call out “¿Agua con gas, o café?” for example, and the students vote by moving to one side of the room or the other.

2

4. Around the World / Sparkle

 This can be played in a circle or with everyone in their seats. Choose one student. He/she stands up next to the student to the right. Call out a word. The first student to give the meaning advances, and the other stays in that seat. The first students to advance all the way around the room and return to his/her original seat wins.

5. Teléfono escrito

This is like the game Telephone, except with drawings and written words.

1. Everyone will start with a piece of paper. At the top, they should sketch a scene. (You may want to give a theme.) They then leave a bit of space, and below describe the scene. Then, they fold the paper so that only the description is showing. Everyone passes the papers to the right.

2. Now everyone reads the description and does their best to sketch what they read. Then, they fold the paper so that only the drawing is showing. Everyone passes to the right again.

3. Only the latest drawing is visible, so everyone looks at it and write a few sentences describing the drawing. Then, they fold the paper so that only the description is showing, and pass to the right again.

You can do this however many rounds you choose. Just be sure to end on a drawing, because the funniest part of the game is comparing the progression of the first drawing to the last. It’s really funny to see what changes happened! Beginners can simply write words they know. Intermediate learners can write sentences.

6. Manzanas a Manzanas

This game is awesome for practicing opinions and adjectives. I have a free download with instructions to play, or you can make your own cards. To play, you will need adjective cards and noun cards. For the noun cards, use whatever vocabulary you want to review.

Put the green adjective cards in the middle, face down. Deal 5-7 red noun cards to each player. Designate a “judge” or juez for the first round. The judge turns the first green card over, and the players put the card they think the judge will pick to match the adjective in the middle. The judge mixes the cards, turns them over, and picks his or her favorite. Whoever that card belongs to keeps the green card as the first point. The leftover red cards can be recycled into the red card pile. The play continues in a circle, with the players taking turns judging.

Model for your class how judges would talk about the cards they are evaluating. For example: La manzana es pequeña. El elefante no es pequeño. or, if it’s something plural: Las manzanas son pequeñas. Los elefantes no son pequeños.

¡Manzanas a Manzanas! (2)

7. Steal the Bacon

This game is best played outside or in a gym. Line up items practiced for vocabulary during the year (clothing, classroom objects, plastic food) exactly in the middle. Make sure nothing is fragile or sharp!

Divide the class into two teams,  and have them arrange themselves each más bajo to más alto. Count up so each team member gets a number (ideally, pairs from each team will be fairly evenly matched). Then have the teams line up on opposite sides of the space.

Call out an item of clothing: el zapato azul. THEN call out a number: ¡Cinco! The students who are from each side race to the middle to grab the zapato azul. To involve more students, call two items of clothing and them two sets of numbers. Just make sure to save the numbers for last so everyone is listening to the clothing terms and paying attention.

8. Categorías

Choose a letter of alphabet. Set a time limit (probably 2 minutes) . Everyone should think of a word that begins with that letter for each category. The trick is to try to think of creative words, because at the end of the time limit the students take turns reading their answers out loud. If anyone else has that word, it gets crossed out for everyone.

Example: The letter is M.  la comida: manzana, la ropa: medias, en la escuela: mapa, los adjetivos: malo, los verbos:  mirar

The first student reads his or her words. Other students have also written malo and manzana, so those words are crossed out. Three words are left: the student got 3 points that round. It is best to arrange students in small groups of 3-4, and have them compare answers at the end of each round.

Get free game sheets for Categorías here!

categorías (6)

9. ¿Quién es?

Choose an object (anything small). Choose one student to be it, and have them go out to the hall. Give the item to one of the students. “It” comes in, and asks yes/no questions to find out who has the item. (It may help to have everyone stand up and sit when they are ruled out. For example, it says: Es un chico? It’s not, so all the chicos sit down.) The competition can come from seeing who can guess in the fewest number of guesses.

10. Mafia

My students absolutely love this game. Martina Bex has a free printable. It includes everything we want: comprehensible input, interpersonal communication, and listening. The printable includes detailed instructions, but here’s the gist: this is a role-playing game, in which certain students are assigned to be the Mafia, other as citizens, and some as doctors and police. The mafia is trying to eliminate the entire “town” before the citizens discover them and  vote them out of the game.

You have to check out Martina’s post! It’s a perfect way to end the year and let the students loose with everything they have learned.

10 AWESOME End-of-the-Year Games (2)

 

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Mano Nerviosa: Awesome Game to Learn the Numbers in Spanish

Mano Nerviosa: Awesome Game to Learn the Numbers in Spanish

Inside: Learn the numbers in Spanish with the game Mano Nerviosa.

Sometimes games waste time. They’re fun, but not necessarily efficient with every student on task.

And then some games have single person engaged, practicing exactly what you want them to practice. Mano Nerviosa is one of those game, and my students beg for it! Once everyone has the hang of it, use it as a brain break, class reward, or for Spanish club.

I learned Mano Nerviosa in Peru, just as a normal card game. When I started teaching, I realized it was perfect for learning numbers 1-13– and actually knowing them. Most students come to me being able to count, or learn 1-10 fairly quickly. If you ask them what seven is, though, they can only get there by counting. This game fixes all that, and works for any topic students learn by chanting or recitation (months, days, ABC’s– you would just need the cards for it).

 

How to Play Mano Nerviosa:

Divide the students into groups of 4-6. (Can be played with 2-3 if needed.)
Ace = 1
2 – 10 = 2 – 10
Jack = 11
Queen = 12
King = 13
(Optional- use the Jokers and write 14 on them)

Divide all of the cards evenly among the players, and use two decks if possible. One person starts by laying a card face up, in the middle, and saying uno (or one— any language works!). The play continues clockwise, laying down cards and counting. When everyone counts to 13, they start back at 1 and count up again. Anytime a number is placed in the middle that matches the number spoken, the players can slap the pile. The first person to hit the card gets the entire pile to keep. The first person to get all the cards in the game wins.

Here’s a video showing the game being played:

 

 

Also, if anyone loses all their cards, they can still slap in. Everyone is involved and engaged with a chance to win, right until the end!

**Give a strict lecture about losing turns, being out of the game, etc. by being too rough. They REALLY get into this one! If you have super-shy, sensitive kids, make sure they are in a less competitive group.**

**Once everyone gets the hang of it, you can choose to play the original way: if anyone incorrectly slaps, they put ten cards back into the pile.**

Here’s my Games in Spanish Pinterest board:

Follow Spanish Mama’s board Spanish Games on Pinterest.

 

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mano-nerviosa

 

 

 

 

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Conversation Jenga for Language Classes

Conversation Jenga for Language Classes

Inside: Conversation Jenga for the language class.

When I put my students in a speaking situation, I like to make it low-pressure and fun. We’ve really enjoyed conversation Jenga lately– which is obviously better than a worksheet with questions to ask each other. In a sense, conversation Jenga is an authentic speaking situation because it’s a an actual game people would set up at parties as a get-to-know-you sort of thing.

 

Conversation jenga for Spanish class

 

I’ve learned to be more realistic about speaking activities, over the years. Language is acquired through input, and speaking activities aren’t the most effective way to get language in. Still, there’s a place to become comfortable speaking the target language. The key is to pick appropriate questions with the students’ proficiency levels in mind. For novice-mid levels, you will still want questions with yes-no or one-word answers. It’s also helpful to choose questions that genuinely interest the students.

To make this more versatile, simply number the blocks. Then, you can create an endless supply of questions or tasks that correspond to the numbers. This makes a fun class reward, station, or an activity for fast finishers.

For more fun activities, check out my Spanish classroom games page

  Follow Spanish Mama’s board Games for the Spanish Classroom on Pinterest.

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Los animales – Ideas and  Freebie!

Los animales – Ideas and Freebie!

animals freebie square

Los Animales Freebie

I have been busy updating my look on my TpT store, and just made a new 41-page game pack for learning animals. Here on the blog, I’m making a few pages of that available for free! I love games for introducing vocabulary. This pack includes games for Go Fish, Yo Tengo (beginner’s and intermediate), Old Maid, Concentration, and a board game. One of the sets also doubles as a flashcard set, which can be used for many other activities. (more…)

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