Lesson 5: Me gusta Activities for Preschool Spanish

Lesson 5: Me gusta Activities for Preschool Spanish

Inside: A preschool lesson with me gusta activities, with comprehensible stories, songs, and input for kids.

esson 5 Goals: I can say that I like or don’t like something.

Target Structures: me gusta, no me gusta, te gusta

(Las uvas, la zanahoria, el queso, la galleta, la lechuga, and los arándanos are also introduced. At this point, they are always presented with pictures or props. Only the target structures are meant to be acquired at this point. Having variety in the foods is fun for book, games, and songs. They can be learned naturally throughout the entire unit.)

Click here to see the week-by-week listing, and to access my overall unit plans. (Each lesson provides enough material for multiple classes.)

Review: Sings the songs learned so far, ¿Cómo te llamas? ball chant, Los animales Bingo.

Movement/brain breaks: Stretch with our movement words: levántate, siéntate, manos arriba, and manos abajo, corre and salta, Duck, Duck, Goose in Spanish, or ¡Salta, salta!

Lesson 5 Me gusta Activities

Activity 1

Introduce the new foods (las uvas, la zanahoria, el queso, la galleta, la lechuga, and los arándanos). Use props or toys if you can! These foods will appear in the stories, songs, and games throughout the lesson, so just go for comprehension and don’t expect students to produce them for a while.

Show the lettuce, for example, and say, Es lechuga. Use the animals props and say, El caballo come la lechuga, or hand it to a student and ask, ¿Emily come la lechuga o come la manazana?

Teaching Preschool Spanish: La comida.

Activity 2

Tell the story El pato que tiene hambre, available below. Stop to ask questions and check for understanding as necessary.

 

Activity 3

Do some total physical response with the words learned so far. Say a word or phrase, and they act it out. El gato dice miau, come la manzana, toma agua, etc. This is a perfect time to watch what everyone is doing and get a check on the pace of the lessons. Always go as slow as necessary, repeating games and activities as needed. These lessons are packed with new targets, so if anything is shaky I take extra time before moving onto the next lesson.

Activity 4

Play ¿Qué hay en la bolsa? again, from Lesson 3. Have bags ready with toy foods inside, or sneak foods into one bag for each turn. Sit in a circle, and the kids take turns getting a bag. They have to put their hand in the bag and guess what food is inside just by feeling it. Once they guess the food, we talk about it. ¿Te gusta el maíz? ¿El perro come el maíz? etc.

 

Supplemental Me gusta activities and resources for home or class:

A lesson on me gusta and no me gusta:

Sesame Street episode on me gusta/ no me gusta:

¿Qué color es la fresa? (Uses the phrases ¿Qué color es…?):

Peppa Pig episode in Spanish that mentions foods and me gusta:

Peppa Pig episode in Spanish that mentions colors frequently:

A silly, highly comprehensible song that teachers me gusta/no me gusta:

A silly, highly comprehensible song that teachers me gusta/no me gusta:

Want More?

If you like this lesson, click to purchase the whole unit! You’ll get games, printables, mini-books, and more!

Play Bingo with pictures of the foods. To keep the language as “whole” as possible, I call out the terms as Me gusta el helado. Me gustan las uvas. If the words are very new, show a picture as you call out the term.

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Lesson 1: Greetings Activities for Preschool Spanish

Lesson 1: Greetings Activities for Preschool Spanish

Inside: Activities for a ¿Cómo te llamas? and me llamo lesson for preschool Spanish classes.

Lesson 1 Goals: I can greet my teacher and friends.

Target Structuresbuenos días, ¿Cómo estás?, Muy bien, gracias, el pollito, and dice.

Click here to see the week-by-week listing, and to access my overall unit plans. (Each lesson provides enough material for multiple classes.)

Movement/brain breaks: Stretch with our movement words: levántate, siéntate, manos arriba, and manos abajo.

¿Cómo te llamas? & Me llamo Lesson for Preschool

Activity 1

Teach the song Buenos días. This will be a good way to start future classes, and you can teach the whole song, or just focus on the buenos días line.

As you learn the song, do motions for each part (stretching in the morning, hands up, questioning, for how are you, thumbs up, and pointing to a friend for usted).

 

 

Activity 2

 The morning, afternoon, and night picture cards can be given to each student, or just used by the teacher (see below to download Unit 1). It could be a special student job to hold them while singing the greeting song, as well.

You could have the students color the cards and then hold them up as you say “buenas días” or “buenas noches” as well.

Buenos días greeting cards for preschool Spanish lesson

Activity 3

Teach the first line to Los pollitos: Los pollitos dicen pío, pío, pío. Show the chick puppet (free printable) to teach el pollito, and move the mouth for pío, pío.

Circle both pollito and dice. ¿El pollito dice <muu>? ¡No! ¿El elefante dice <pío>? ¡No! ¿El pollito dice <pío? ¡Sí! etc. Once the kids feel comfortable with that phrase, give them their own little chick, and practice singing the first line several times

  Los pollitos dice (free printable puppets and lyrics)

 

Supplemental Me gusta activities and resources for home or class:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ij5R1YTG48Q

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smW3KJQEw4w

Want More?

If you like this lesson, click to purchase the whole unit! You’ll get games, printables, mini-books, and more!

Mano Nerviosa: Awesome Game to Learn the Numbers in Spanish

Mano Nerviosa: Awesome Game to Learn the Numbers in Spanish

Inside: Learn the numbers in Spanish with the game Mano Nerviosa.

Sometimes games waste time. They’re fun, but not necessarily efficient with every student on task.

And then some games have single person engaged, practicing exactly what you want them to practice. Mano Nerviosa is one of those game, and my students beg for it! Once everyone has the hang of it, use it as a brain break, class reward, or for Spanish club.

I learned Mano Nerviosa in Peru, just as a normal card game. When I started teaching, I realized it was perfect for learning numbers 1-13– and actually knowing them. Most students come to me being able to count, or learn 1-10 fairly quickly. If you ask them what seven is, though, they can only get there by counting. This game fixes all that, and works for any topic students learn by chanting or recitation (months, days, ABC’s– you would just need the cards for it).

 

How to Play Mano Nerviosa:

Divide the students into groups of 4-6. (Can be played with 2-3 if needed.)
Ace = 1
2 – 10 = 2 – 10
Jack = 11
Queen = 12
King = 13
(Optional- use the Jokers and write 14 on them)

Divide all of the cards evenly among the players, and use two decks if possible. One person starts by laying a card face up, in the middle, and saying uno (or one— any language works!). The play continues clockwise, laying down cards and counting. When everyone counts to 13, they start back at 1 and count up again. Anytime a number is placed in the middle that matches the number spoken, the players can slap the pile. The first person to hit the card gets the entire pile to keep. The first person to get all the cards in the game wins.

Here’s a video showing the game being played:

 

 

Also, if anyone loses all their cards, they can still slap in. Everyone is involved and engaged with a chance to win, right until the end!

**Give a strict lecture about losing turns, being out of the game, etc. by being too rough. They REALLY get into this one! If you have super-shy, sensitive kids, make sure they are in a less competitive group.**

**Once everyone gets the hang of it, you can choose to play the original way: if anyone incorrectly slaps, they put ten cards back into the pile.**

Here’s my Games in Spanish Pinterest board:

Follow Spanish Mama’s board Spanish Games on Pinterest.

 

.Like it? Pin it!

mano-nerviosa

 

 

 

 

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