An Easy-Peasy Activity to Learn Spanish with Songs

An Easy-Peasy Activity to Learn Spanish with Songs

Inside: A fun & easy activity to learn Spanish with songs in class, only using a piece of paper.

One of my favorite things about teaching textbook-free is that authentic songs in Spanish are central to class now. If you’re not sure how to start, read how to teach Spanish with authentic songs, and then browse my suggestions for songs in Spanish, for all ages.

I can be a scatter-brained teacher, and my go-to activities are always the simple ones. I call this listening activity Draw, Listen, Check. It works for authentic songs and only requires a piece of paper– perfect for last-minute fillers and reinforcement. Here’s how it goes!

 

Draw, Listen, Check: An Activity to Learn Spanish with Songs

 

Choose a song your class is already familiar with. Pull out 4-6 structures you want to emphasize, and write them on the board, or dictate them. The students should divide a paper into 4-6 sections, and quickly illustrate one structure into each square.

This is what one student drew when we did Vivir mi vida by Marc Antony. The target structures were:

  • la lluvia
  • reír
  • bailar
  • vivir mi vida
  • para qué llorar
  • para qué sufrir

Draw, listen, check image

Erase the target structures from the board, and play the song without showing the lyrics. The students should put a check mark in the boxes each time they hear the corresponding phrase. That’s all!

This is not an assessment, but just a quick way to highlight the target structures, get some input, and practice listening skills. My students like it because it’s low-pressure and they usually see it as a personal competition to get the closest score.

Some variations on Draw, Listen, Check:

  • Pair up the students. Cut up one paper by section, and spread out the papers on a surface between the students. Listen to the song again, and students try to slap the phrase they hear, first. I literally have no way to keep track of points– this one is probably best for small, responsible classes.

 

  • Before listening to the song, use the phrases to play Charades or Pictionary.

 

  • Some songs repeat certain phrases a LOT. If you have a song like that, crumple up a piece of paper after doing Draw, Write, Check. Stand in a circle and play the song. Give the paper to one student, to start. Every time the phrase is sung, the student can pass the paper to the next person. If you pause the song, the student holding the paper is out. (See? Like Hot Potato!)

 

Continue as long as you like until you have a winner or several winners.This would be a really fun brain break!!

Have more ideas for learning Spanish through songs? Leave a comment!

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A Beginner’s Guide to Learning Spanish Online for Free

A Beginner’s Guide to Learning Spanish Online for Free

Inside: Teach yourself Spanish, with these free online Spanish resources.

This is the list I wish I’d had as a new teacher, or as a Spanish learner myself! Here I’ve collected my favorite online Spanish resources, and all are free (though some may have paid upgrade options). These are great for supplementing in the classroom or practicing at home.

If you are looking for a younger crowd, I’ve got a great list of sites to learn Spanish online with kids, an Spanish Netflix shows and cartoons, for kids.

 

Teach Yourself Spanish: Online Interactive Lessons

 

1. DuoLingo is unparalleled as far as free lessons go. You can use it online, although it’s most convenient as an app. Take a placement test and move through lessons at your own pace. You can practice speaking, listening, and reading, and even have “chat” with native speakers. It’s great for teachers, who can get weekly progress reports of their students.

DuoLingo can be a little frustrating because it can be picky about small errors, but it seems to be improving. There is also a new stories feature, that seems to be more in line with comprehensible input!

2. Fluencia Similar to DuoLingo, this site/app takes you through bite-sized lessons that include listening, speaking, and reading.

3. FSI I haven’t personally used this site, but it came strongly recommend here. Put out Foreign Service Institute to train foreign workers and officials, it includes an online textbook and audio lessons.

4. Coffee Break Spanish Some of the features are paid, but you can access free podcasts.

5. Busuu The free version is a bit limited, but gives self-paced interactive lessons and connects you to native speakers as well.

 

Learn Spanish Online with Videos

 

1. Mi Vida Loca This series is one the best online Spanish resources! Created for absolute beginners, you get an immersive adventure set in Spain, with lessons along the way. There’s a tad more English than I’d like, but it’s still great. I created a series of games and links to accompany each episode, as well as a free packet to accompany the first 5 episodes.

MI VIDA LOCA Games and Activities

2. Extra Extra en español exposes learners to Spanish, in the context of a sitcom-like setting (similiar to the show Friends), through 13 episodes. The show is really funny, and though most teachers don’t have any problem showing it, the romance scenes are super exaggerated (awkward? weird?) Parents/teachers might want to preview. Here’s the first episode:

 

3. Destinos So Destinos is a bit dated. If you can get past that, it’s a great resource! 52 episodes follow a lawyer around the world as she tries to solve a mystery. They’re a great way to get immersed in Spanish in the context of a telenova, with culture thrown in too. See episode 1 here:

 

4. Video Ele is a series of videos that introduce different themes and strutures, with some culture thrown in. My students find them a teensy boring out of context, but for a motivated learner or to show a specific topic in class, they’re great! Here’s an example:

 

5. 5 Minute Spanish A grammar-based approach, these videos are short, concise clips on iTunes that take you through the traditional Spanish 1 progression. Also includes a free downloadable textbook.

6. ¿Eres tú, María? A mystery series set in Madrid, for Spanish learners who have been studying for a few months already.

Teach Yourself Spanish with Authentic Listening

1. Spanish Proficiency Exercises All are video recordings of native speakers from different countries, and are organized by proficiency tasks and levels (score!).

2. Spanish Listening This is another gold mine of native speakers, with videos divided by topic and level. There are also activities to go with each recording.

3. Radio Ambulante Produced by NPR, this podcast contains Latin American stories and is best suited for intermediate to advanced learners.

4. Lyrics Training An online fill-in-the-blank activity for listening to music in Spanish.

5. Ver-Taal Authentic commericals, trailers, newscasts, and more in Spanish, with comprehension activities as well.

6. Learn Spanish Podcasts Very cool site for learning Spanish through comprehensible podcasts (not for absolute beginners), with transcripts included.

 

Online Spanish Resources: Reading Practice

 

1. BBC Mundo World news in Spanish.

2. People en español

3. ESPN in Spanish

4. Newsela This is a great resource for news articles. The best thing is that you can choose grade levels to simplify the reading if desired.

 

Spanish Grammar Resources

 

1. Study Spanish This website has most Spanish grammar topics broken down into lessons. The explanations are clear with examples, and there are a variety of ways to practie.

2. Spanish Language & Culture Lots of grammar activities and in-context practice, with some listening and song activities thrown in.

3. 121 Spanish Is a well-organized site, with video as well as grammar activities.

4. Señor Jordan A Spanish teacher, Señor Jordan has a series of YouTube videos explaining various Spanish structures, with some songs as well. Since I don’t do much grammar in class, this is a great online Spanish resource that my students can do at home. He also now teaches using comprehensible input, and is beginning to create storytelling videos that teach grammar as a pop-up. Here’s an example:

 

What sites did I miss? Let me know in the comments below!

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The Best Free Online Spanish Resources

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The Ultimate Resource Guide to Learn Spanish Online with Kids, For Free

The Ultimate Resource Guide to Learn Spanish Online with Kids, For Free

Inside: Free resources to learn Spanish online with kids.

It’s easier than ever to learn language now, with so many online Spanish resources for kids– for free! The hardest part is just going through all of them and deciding where to start.

No worries though: I’ve collected and sorted through the most popular Spanish resources, so you can find what you need. If I am missing any, let me know! I’ve also got you covered if you want to teach yourself Spanish and need resources for an older crowd.

 

Learn Spanish Online with Kids: Authentic Shows and Series

 

1. Peppa Pig
There are tons of free Peppa Pig shows on YouTube. They will be difficult for true beginners, but if your kids know a little they will definitely recognize words and phrases. Most of the language is clear, simple, and repetitive, and the action is slow enough that the language is more accessible. (Find the official Spanish channel here.)

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The Best Spanish Cartoons and Shows on Netflix

The Best Spanish Cartoons and Shows on Netflix

Inside: The best Spanish cartoons and shows for kids, on Netflix.

Cartoons can be a great source of Spanish input for little learners. Now, we all know to limit screen time for kids, right?

BUT… videos and shows really can be an incredible resource for authentic and rich language.

I’m not a native Spanish-speaker and can’t provide a totally fluent environment for my kids, by myself. (My husband is fluent, but not at home as much as I am.) So we rely on music, books, and shows to round out the input. Sometimes it’s funny to hear my three-year-old bust out a phrase I know I’ve never used (¡Ay, cielos! from Pooh).

Netflix has a fair amount of cartoons and movies with audio in Spanish, and here are my top picks. They do pull and add shows, so this list may change. Lucky for us, most Netflix original series are available in multiple languages and stay there for good!

(If you are looking for something for yourself, here’s a giant list of movies in Spanish, and another huge list of Spanish shows on Netflix. I’ve also got you covered with lists of bilingual books for kids, authentic books in Spanish for kids, songs in Spanish, and free online resources to learn Spanish with kids.)

 

Our Favorite Spanish Cartoons on Netflix for Kids:

 

1. Puffin Rock: We love, love, love this show! It’s nature-based, with lovely graphics and sweet story-lines. The audio is very clear and understandable, and would be perfect for learners who understand a fair amount of Spanish, but aren’t fluent yet.

2. Winnie the Pooh: This is another favorite. Unfortunately, the original movies are no longer available, but there are still several to choose from. High-quality visuals and high-quality audio and music.

3. Peppa Pig: I really like the slow pace and simple storylines. This is an excellent show for kids who aren’t fluent, because the audio is very clear. Even beginners would be able to pick out the phrases they already know. (This show isn’t available in every country. If you can’t find it, you can still access the Peppa Pig Spanish Channel on YouTube, with complete episodes!)

4. Pocoyo: This is the best show for absolute beginners, as the phrases tend to be more isolated and easy to catch. Kids love this one!

5. Sarah and Duck: My kids like this one a lot right now. Everyday stories about a girl and her pet duck. (Not available in Spanish in every country.)

6. Little Baby Bum: This is a series of popular children’s songs and nursery rhymes available in Spanish. Listening to songs is really one of the most effective ways to learn a language, and would be perfect for little ones.

 

More Shows in Spanish on Netflix for Kids:

 

Below are series we haven’t necessarily seen or watch, but are in Spanish. Let me know if you love any and would recommend them!

1. Veggie Tales in the House

2. 72 Cutest Animals (a nature show)

3. The Hive

4. Clifford

5. Beat Bugs

6. Cars Toons: Mater’s Tall Tales

7. Ask the Storybots

8. Word Party

9. Popples

10. Luna Petunia

11. Pororo

12. Inspector Gadget

13. Curious George

14. Kazoops

15. Lalaloopsy

16. Julie’s Greenroom

17. Justin Time Go!

18. Care Bears and Cousins

19. Masha and the Bear

And movies (some aren’t toddler-appropriate):

1. The Little Prince

2. Tarzan

3. The Fox and the Hound

4. The Wings of Life (nature documentary)

5. Lilo & Stitch

6. Kung Fu Panda

7. Brother Bear

8. Zootopia

9. All the Mickey Mouse movies

10. Disney Short Films

 

Did I miss any of your favorite Spanish cartoons and shows? Leave your suggestions in the comments below!

 

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Shows in Spanish on Netflix for Kids

How to teach Spanish with Authentic Songs

How to teach Spanish with Authentic Songs

Inside: How to teach Spanish with authentic music, in the middle and high school classroom.

I didn’t know how to teach Spanish with authentic music, as a new teacher. Fresh from living in Peru and head over heels for the language and culture, I sat down with the textbook. Apparently, for the first half of Spanish I, we would learn classroom objects, articles, greetings, and regular verbs. Hmm. How did authentic songs with irregular verbs and  fit in?

I tried out some of my favorite music in class anyway, but it kind of bombed. We were listening to noise. Extremely catchy noise, but nothing comprehensible. I reverted to grammar songs and conjugation jingles. They were cute, but I was feeding my students the parts: hoping one day all the pieces would come together into the whole language I wanted them to acquire.

Then I finally got that I needed to start with whole, intact, understandable language. Real-life communication is the goal, and songs became more accessible because we were learning high-frequency verbs right away. I saw how comprehensible input and authentic resources could work together. My students could acquire authentic language and real-life skills like getting the gist of a text and picking familiar words out from unfamiliar word. My job was to introduce songs with the language we needed, and find a way to make it comprehensible.

So, here’s what I wish someone had told me as a newbie teacher:

1. Think through the goal.

 

How will the song connect to your current targets? Will it be a cultural connection? Are you looking to highlight a pattern (present progressive, ir + a, etc.)? Do you want to focus on certain phrases or vocabulary? Here are some huge lists of authentic Spanish songs I came up with for Spanish 1, Spanish 2, and Spanish 2.

2. Think about how much of the song can be comprehensible.

 

How much of the song can you use? I used to get stuck because I didn’t know how to use a song that used many words we didn’t know, or grammar we hadn’t learned. I really think that songs are the best way to hook students to content just above their proficiency level. You can, of course, explain the entire song or provide a translation.

– Some authentic songs can be 100% comprehensible, if you work through them a bit. Very simple songs-perhaps children’s songs- are a great way to see how language works as a whole.

– Some are best because they repeat key phrases. Your students might not understand everything, but esto no me gusta and te estaba buscando get repeated a bazillion times and they never forget those phrases. If you are using a grammar-based approach, this is a good way to help set patterns; if you are CI-based, it helps to cement target structures from a different context.

– For other songs, the verses aren’t the focus, but the chorus can be understand and remembered. Voy a reír, voy a bailar, vivir mi vida, lalala…  The chorus is what your students will walk away singing anyway, so in this situation zero in all of your activities on that part.

How to teach Spanish with authentic songs

3. Plan how you’ll make the song comprehensible.

 

How can you bridge the gap from what your students know, to the song? There’s a whole lot more out there than what I’ve done in class, but here are some ideas. This will of course depend on how much of the song you plan to use and teach.

-Pre-teach important vocabulary/phrases.

– Listen to the song and project the lyrics onto the board. Focus on the parts you want them to know, and summarize the parts in between so they get the gist of the lyrics. Circle the phrases you want to emphasize, asking personalized questions to the students. In La bicicleta, for example, Shakira says, puedo ser feliz… I pause there, and we discuss. Students might fill in the blank for themselves (puedo ser feliz… tomando café, sin tarea, etc.) I don’t pause and translate/discuss every line, as that would kill the enjoyment. We will listen to the songs many times, so there is plenty of time to study different parts.

– Create an embedded reading to scaffold the text of the song.

– Watch the music video if it’s appropriate (preview, preview preview…  I speak from experience!), and pause to discuss. Use language the students know to discuss what’s happening and to help them interpret the lyrics.

I think songs are one of the best uses of authentic resources. While most of the time I want class to be comprehensible, music is a good way to get students to take risks and try to derive meaning from something above their level.

4. Create some activities to work through the song.

 

– Try Draw, Write, Check: have your students divide a piece of paper into 4 or 6  parts. Give them a phrase to draw for each part. Then, play the song. Each time they hear the phrase they drew, make a tally mark and check numbers after the song.

– Do an old-fashoined cloze activity.

– Type up the lyrics on the left side of a paper, and have students summarize each section on the right.

– Ask several questions (Is the singer sad? What does he wish would happen?) Give the students markers to highlight and color code the lyrics that give evidence for the answers.

– Change the voice of the singer from third to first person, or vice-versa.

– Make up actions and sing along!

More ideas from other teachers on how to teach with authentic music:

 

¡La música! from Kristy Placido

What can I DO {-re-mi-fa-so-la-ti-da} with a song?

– Create a PPT with screenshots of the music video, a la MovieTalk like in this example from Kristy Placido

Música miércoles for using Spanish songs weekly from Mis Clases Locas

 

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how to teach Spanish with authentic songs

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Find Your Blob: A Fun Brain Break for Spanish Class

Find Your Blob: A Fun Brain Break for Spanish Class

Inside: A fun brain break in Spanish for the language classroom.

I’m working hard this year to make sure I break up our classes with some sort of movement. I came up with Find Your Blob for something that’s quick and ties into the lesson. The students are speaking the TL, but because it’s related to their opinions and preferences, they get into it. (It’s also LOW-PRESSURE. I don’t consider it a brain break if an activity creates anxiety for the participants!)

How to Do “Find Your Blob”

The idea is simple: Come up with a question related to the content you’re working on. ¿Qué te gusta hacer?, for example.

Then, list or brainstorm 4-6 answers (depends on your class size). Me gusta: correr, dormir, leer, viajar, etc. The students silently pick their answer. 

When I say so, everyone stands up and walks around asking the question. If the answers match, those students stick together. Then those two look for more people. Everyone with the same answer has to be in the same blob (or group of people), until the whole room is sorted into four blobs.

That’s it! I like to erase the two most popular answers, and replace them, so everyone has to mix it up again. Most everyone in Spanish 1 this morning, for example, chose cansado in response to ¿Cómo estás? So we erased that, and added in more creative options. Once they get the hang of it, you can add in things like ¡Yo también! or ¡A mí también! 

If the groups are interesting (perhaps one person is alone, or one group is huge), it can make for some fun conversation and helps you get to know your students. I ask what the groups represent, which could bring in ¿Qué les gusta hacer?, and then Nos gusta… I’ve really liked this because the language is organic and memorable. Sometimes we do two or three rounds of responses, and then sit down, ready to work again.

You can do this with anything– any tense, any topic. Some more ideas:

If you could be any _________, what would you be?
If you could have a superpower, what would it be?
What would you like to do this weekend?
What’s your favorite _______?
You’re going on vacation. Where are you going?
Which book would you like to live in?
If you had to wear one outfit the rest of your life, what would it be?

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Find You Blob, a Fun Speaking Activity for the World Language Classroom

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