Spanish Easter Traditions: Ideas & Resources for the Classroom

Spanish Easter Traditions: Ideas & Resources for the Classroom

Inside: A round-up of classroom iresources for Spanish Easter traditions.

 

La Pascua– Easter in Spanish– is a big deal across the Spanish-speaking world, whose history is closely connected to the Catholic church. The month of Lent culminates in Semana Santa, which commemorates the last week in the life of Jesus. In Spain and many Latin American countries, Easter is a bigger deal than Christmas, with deeply rooted traditions.

I’ve included a mix of religious and non-religious activities. In my opinion, it’s important to acknowledge the religious roots because they makes sense of many cultural traditions. I think you can do this without pushing religious beliefs, but I’ve tried to include non-religious options if you have to be careful to stay secular. 

Let’s not re-invent the wheel for ideas in the classroom! I’ve gathered some awesome resources, for all ages. 

 

Spanish Easter Traditions & Activities

 easter in Spanish class

Here’s an overview of ideas for teaching about or celebrating Easter traditions in Spanish. As you scroll down, you’ll see the videos, links, and expanded resources you might want to use. This is just the condensed version:

  • Learn about cascarones (eggs) by making them, watching how-to videos, or seeing how they’re made and used throughout Latin America.
  • Re-use those plastic eggs for a variety of activities! Do scrambled sentences inside, use for maracas, or make a matching activity.
  • Read infographs and watch videos to learn about the cultural traditions surrounding Pascua. Compare/contrast traditions with those in the US. 
  • Tell or storyask a story based on Easter themes: cascarones gone wrong between friends, something Spring-based (mention that in South America seasons are reversed).

 

If you are here looking for specific information and activities for Spanish Easter traditions, you can jump to specific sections here:

 

Otherwise, keep scrolling and browse away to learn more!

Spanish Easter Activities

 

Books About Pascua


Printables

 

Printable vocabulary coloring sheet from Spanglish Baby:

Conejo Finger Puppets (scroll alllll the way down to the songs section to see the Conejito song!)

Conejo Finger Puppets Search from Spanish Playground

Conversation Questions from Spanish Playground

Semana Santa Coloring Pages (Religious)

 

#Authres for Easter in Spanish

 

There are lots of infographs you can use with Easter. These are fun to to prompt discussion and give the students a chance to see what they can understand from an authentic resource.

This is only a portion of the original infograph. See the original here

 

Visit my Easter in Spanish board on Pinterest to find lots more realia!

Credit: Twitter

Videos on Spanish Easter Traditions

 

The following videos are designed for Spanish learners who want to know more about traditions in Spain and Latin America.

 

Easter Holiday

Dreaming Spanish delivers interesting, novice-level language that’s perfect for beginners!

 

 

An Interactive Video on Semana Santa

This one is so cool! You’ll learn all about foods and celebrations all over the Spanish-speaking, and the students get to pick which ones to study first. 

 

Semana Santa, Spanish Easter 

 

 

Procesiones y Semana Santa

 

 

Bilingual Intro to Holy Week

 

 

Activities with Eggs

 

Make cascarones! You can have your students paint them or color with markers, fill them with confetti, and maybe even take everyone outside to break them on each other.

Throw Away Your Textbook has some good tips for doing cascarones, as does Mundo de Pepita

Use plastic eggs to do this scrambled sentence activity from Señora Chase. The nice thing about this one is that you can tie the sentences into whatever theme/story/song you are working on, but it feels Easter-y/Spring-ish because of the eggs.

Use another version of scrambled sentences Totally Comprehensible Latin, with whole sentence strips inside the eggs. This is a dictation & listening activity that can be done in pairs. It takes a little work upfront, but then you only have to supervise once it get going!

5 Ways to Use Leftover Plastic Eggs from Secondary Spanish Space: lots of fun ideas here!

Make maracas from plastic eggs with this SUPER-EASY craft. 

 

 

Videos on Cascarones (Eggs for Easter)

 

See how cascarones de huevos are prepared in a Mexican market. 

 

 

How to make confetti eggs, in Spanish (from an adult and from a kid):

Semana Santa Classroom Resources

 

Make alfombras with DIY Sand Alfombras 

Browse these photos of real-life Guateman alfombras

Semana Santa vocab at a glance. (Visiting this site downloads an audio file– you can choose to block it.)

Semana Santa Webquest in English

La semana santa en Guatemala from Estudia Feliz. This story includes preterite and imperfect as a teacher recounts her experience while traveling there, and she has more printable resources on her site. 

 

Authentic Videos on Semana Santa

 

Here are authentic videos that introduce Semana Santa celebrations in different parts of the Spanish-speaking world. 

 

Semana Santa in Peru

 

 

 

Semana Santa in Guatemala

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semana Santa in Spain

Be aware that the outfits worn on these processions look like the KKK. The capes are meant to symbolize rising to heaven. You will definitely want to preview, and discuss with your classes before using them. (Good opportunity to discuss how culture shapes our reaction to images and symbols.) 

 

 

Semana Santa in Guatemala

 

Videos On Alfombras

 

Las Alfombras en Honduras (introduced in English):

 

 

Detailed video of the Alfombras de Aserrín process:

 

Alfombras from Guatemala:

 

Easter Songs in Spanish

 

De Colores

A famous & traditional song that works well with spring vocabulary. 

 

El Conejito Blanco

So cute, and non-religious for those who need that!

 

 

Easter MOVIETALKS or Videos for Kids

 

Hope these activities and resources have helped you learn more about Spanish Easter traditions, and given you new ideas for classroom activities. If I missed a favorite resource, let me know about it in the comments below!

 

Welcome

Hey! I’m Elisabeth, a teacher and mom raising two bilingual kids in the Peruvian jungle. Read our story here. I love digging up the best Spanish resources for all you busy parents and teachers!

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Love and Friendship Songs for Kids in Spanish

Love and Friendship Songs for Kids in Spanish

Inside: Friendship songs in Spanish for kids and songs about love. 

If you need some songs for Valentine’s Day in Spanish class, there are tons of Valentin’s song options for older Spanish students. (After all… Spanish love songs are famous for their sentiment!) For younger students, it’s best to have some options that focus on friendship and family. Today I’ve got some fun options your little ones will love!

 

Valentine’s and Friendship Songs in Spanish for Kids

 

1. Mi Corazoncito

 

The language may be complicated for beginners, but even little ones will enjoy the chorus in this song, which lends itself to movement and dancing along! Good for teaching the word “corazón.”

 

 

2. Te Quiero

 

I love this sweet song from Fun for Spanish Teachers, which uses simple phrases to teach “te quiero” and “tú eres mi corazón.”  Perfect for novice learners!

 

 

3. Skidamarink

 

Skidamarink is highly comprehensible with a slow pace, and teaches the phrase “te quiero” in the sweet context of animal friends. 

 

 

4. Tiburones de San Valentín

 

If your kids are nuts over Tiburón Bebé like mine are, they will love this one with a Valentine’s twist! You can introduce all sorts of phrases like “querido,” “te amo,” and “Feliz San Valentín” through the comprehensible lyrics as well.

 

 

5. Mis Amigos

 

These lyrics are more advanced, but it does have lots of repetitions of “mis amigos”! The animation is also nice for talking about what friends can do together. 

 

 

6. Día del amor y la amistad

 

Here’s a bilingual song that introduces what Valentine’s day is all about. 

 

 

7. Mi Mascota, Mi Amigo

 

If you want to talk about animal friends and pets, here’s your song! My kids reacted a little to the kids kissing their pets, so that’s your call, but the song is easy to follow for kids. 

 

 

8. Amiguito, Baila Conmigo

 

Although the lyrics don’t say much about friendship, this is a fun song that teaches a dance between friends and review lots of movement and direction words. 

 

Welcome

Hey! I’m Elisabeth, a teacher and mom raising two bilingual kids in the Peruvian jungle. Read our story here. I love digging up the best Spanish resources for all you busy parents and teachers!

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Carta a Los Reyes Magos: Free Printable and Activities

Carta a Los Reyes Magos: Free Printable and Activities

Inside: Printable Carta a Los Reyes Magos, and resources for teaching about Los Tres Reyes.

While children in the U.S. and other countries are busy writing to Santa, other children are addressing their letters to Los Reyes Magos: the three wisemen who visited baby Jesus. They’ll leave their shoes out, along with straw and water, and wake up the next morning expecting a gift. Where is this tradition from, and what does it involve?

 

Los Reyes Magos

 

The story of three kings visiting the Christ child stretches back 2,000 years. According to the gospel of Matthew, several Magi from the East made the journey to bring the newborn king three royal gifts– gold, frankincense, and myrrh– following a strange star that had appeared in the sky. 

Since then, Western Church tradition has recorded them as Balthasar (king of Arabia), Melchior (king of Persia), and Gaspar (king of India). Catholic traditions such as those in Spain use these names, though Syrian and Eastern churches record other names.

 

Reyes Magos

 

Many Christians celebrate Los Reyes Magos on Epiphany, the twelfth day of Christmas, which falls on January 6th. Many families in the Spanish-speaking world leave their Christmas tree up until Epiphany, and have the tradition of children receiving gifts that day. January 5th is a day of parades, in which the Three Kings are reenacted as the Cabalgata de los Reyes Magos, throwing sweets to people watching in the streets.

In many places, children write letters to the Tres Reyes Magos in anticipation of Epiphany. The night of January 5th, they leave their shoes by the fireplace, doors, or windows. Many families leave food for the Magi, as well as straw and water for the camels, or a box of greens. During the night, the Magi will travel the world and leave gifts. When kids wake up in the morning, they find presents (sometimes wrapped, sometimes candy or money) where they left their shoes. Sometimes they also find that the food has been nibbled at, or even disappeared!

 

Roscón de Reyes

 

In some parts of the world (including Spain and Mexico), families eat a ring-shaped cake with candied fruit on top, and sometimes cream in the middle. The fruit represents the jewels from the Reyes Magos, and inside are two hidden objects: a faba bean, and figurine (in some parts, it’s a king, or Magi, in others it’s a different figure). The person who find the figurine in their slice gets crowned king or queen of the day. The unlucky person who gets the bean has to pay for the roscón!

Roscón de Reyes

 

 

Activities for Los Reyes Magos

 

To learn more about the traditions surrounding the Reyes Magos, I’ve got a round-up of resources below, to help you teach about them in the classroom or at home.

This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for your support!

 

Books About Día de Los Reyes

 

Here are some suggestions for learning about the Reyes Magos through picture books in Spanish. Remember that if you are working with Spanish learners and the text is too advanced, you can do a “book talk”– simply narrating the text in more comprehensible language. 

Cartas
a Los Reyes Magos

 

If you’d like to write a letter to the Reyes Magos, I’ve got some fun templates for different ages and learners. They include editable versions, so you can adjust to the proficiency levels of your students. Click here or on the image to download the set!

If you have students who can learn about religion in the context of culture, but feel uncomfortable “participating” in a religious holiday with something like a letter, the set includes a more neutral reflection on the past year for older students. 

Carta a Los Reyes Magos

Crafts and Ideas

 

Preschool/Elementary:

 

Make Paper Shoes for Three Kings’ Day from Mundo de Pepita

Slideshare Presentation on Los Reyes Magos

Mini-Bundle on The Three Kings in Spanish from Monarca Language

 

Middle/High School:

 

Video and Text on Los Reyes Magos from Si Quieres Aprender

 

Intermediate Article in Spanish about Los Tres Reyes Magos from Veinte Mundos

Presentation, Games, and Activities Based on Reyes Magos Video from Elena Lopez

Cultural Activities: El Día de los Reyes Magos reading and game from the Comprehensible Classroom

Reading Activities Using Tweets about Los Reyes Magos from For the Love of Spanish

 
 
Sudoku on Día de Reyes from Comprendes Mendez SpanishShop
 

Infographs

 

Try this adorable and comprehensible infograph from Mundo de Pepita, perfect for a younger crowd, or these options:

Credit: Horacero

Credit: Notimex

Videos

 

Here are some videos that show different traditions and the story behind the Magi, for different ages and proficiency levels.

 

Cute & quick silent video showing a children leaving his shoes out:

 

Dora salva el día de los Reyes Magos:

 

Comprehensible news clip on Los Tres Reyes (heads up that one of the kings uses blackface to represent one king–this is a controversial practice that people are now bringing attention to, and I would at least discuss it):

 

News clip on Día de Los Reyes, with lots of interviews with kids:

 

Spanish family explains the differences between celebrations in the US and Spain:

 

Video showing a family’s preparations in Puerto Rico:

 

How Julie from Mundo de Pepita introduces Los Reyes Magos to her elementary students:

 

“La Otra Carta,” a sweet commercial about kids writing letters to the three kings:

 

Traditional song “Llegaron Ya Los Reyes Tres” with traditional Andean Music:

Welcome

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Spanish Christmas Books for Kids

Spanish Christmas Books for Kids

Inside: Christmas Spanish books for kids.

 

When I was growing up, my mom created little Christmas traditions we kept up for years. One of them was “the book basket.” We had a stack of annual favorites, and she would read a little bit from each one, finishing the last page or chapter of each on Christmas Eve. Every year she’d get choked up in the same parts, and even my dad would tear up on the last page of classics like A Certain Small Shepherd and The 24 Days Before Christmas.

We rolled our eyes at our sentimental parents, of course. But of course, here I am with kids of my own, boo-hooing my way through sweet books too. Now that I’ve got bilingual kids, I’ve been on the hunt for Christmas books in Spanish, so I can carry on the family traditions with our own bilingual, bicultural twist. 

In this post I’m sharing my favorite titles in Spanish, and would love to hear your suggestions as well! For more book lists and suggestions, be sure to see my Spanish children’s books page. 

This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for your support!

 

Christmas Spanish Books for Kids

 

Spanish Christmas books

 

 

Christmas Traditions

 

El Niño Espíritu by John Bierhorst and Barbara Cooney
(Mexico)

The nativity story, as told by Spanish missionaries to the Aztecs and one that dates back to the 16th century. Cooney is an award-winning illustrator who brings the story to life with period illustrations.

Feliz Nochebuena, Feliz Navidad by Maricel Presilla
(Cuba, Puerto Rico)

A tour of the author’s Christmas memories from growing up in the Caribbean, centered on the delicious food and recipes, and the people who made them. 

¡Ya Llegan los Reyes Magos! by Georgina Lazaro

A beautiful book that introduces traditions surroundings Los Reyes Magos, from a child’s perspective. 

The Night of Las Posadas by Tomie dePaola
(Santa Fe, New Mexico)

Though this one isn’t in Spanish, Tomie dePaola stories and paintings are just irresistible. This story tells about a small town’s procession of Las Posadas. Mystery and miracle follow, to save the posadas on Christmas night.  

 

Contemporary Christmas Stories

 

¡Qué Montón de Tamales! by Gary Soto
(Mexico)

As María helps her mother in their family tradition of making tamales for nochebuena, she tries on her mother’s ring. It slips off and gets lost in the mountains off masa they are preparing! María enlists the help of her cousins to eat all the tamales and find it.

La Noche Buena: A Christmas Story by Antonio Sacre
(Cuba, Miami)

This year, Nina leaves behind a snowy landscape to spend Christmas with her grandmother in Miami– where it’s hot and humid. There, she learns about another side of Christmas, full of new food, dancing, music and family.

El Árbol de Navidad by Alma Flor Ada

A family decorates their Christmas tree together, as told by rhyming cumulative text with each added ornament. I love the folk illustrations in the story as well. 

Arturo and the Navidad Birds by Anne Broyles
(Central America)

Arturo is visiting his grandmother, and she tells him the story behind each ornament as they decorate together. When Arturo accidentally breaks a bird ornament, he is filled with guilt and tries to make another. A sweet bilingual story that won second place in the International Latino Book Awards for picture books.

 

Translated Classics

 

Los renos rebeldes de Navidad by Jan Brett

We love Jan Brett at our house, and I was so excited to see this one in Spanish! She retells a Ukranian folk tale in Spanish in this gorgeous book, about a young girl in charge of Santa’s reindeer. 

¡Cómo el Grinch robó la Navidad! by Dr. Seuss

It’s hard to get more classic than the Grinch for Christmas, and now you can enjoy this story in Spanish!

El Árbol de Navidad del Señor Viladomat by Robert Barry

Señor Viladomat has accidentally bought a tree that is too big for his house. What he does with the chopped-off end part brings Christmas cheer to many neighbors, both animal and human

La Navidad del Camioncito Azul by Alice Schertle

Everybody’s favorite little blue truck is back for Navidad, with a counting-Christmas-trees twist. 

 

The Legend of the Poinsettia by Tomie dePaola

(Mexico)

Written in English, this recounts the Mexican folktale behind the poinsettia (or flor de la Nochebuena), and Holy Night. As always with dePaola, gorgeous paintings vividly accompany the story set against a group of children waiting for Christmas. 

There are several other versions available for this classic folk tale:

El Regalo de La Flor de Nochebuena retold by Pat Mora

Milagro de la Flor de Nochebuena retold by Brian Cavanaugh

Zetta the Poinsettia by Alma Hammond

 

Bilingual or English Books

 

Feliz Navidad by Jose Feliciano

A bilingual introduction to Jose Feliciano’s classic songs, with lift-up flaps for little fingers. 

El Mejor Regalo del Mundo: La Leyenda de la Vieja Belen by Julia Alvarez

(Dominican Republic)

Julia Alvarez is one of my favorite Latina authors, and you won’t want to miss this delightful bilingual re-telling of the Dominican folk character La Vieja Belen. 

Tres Reyes Mago: Colors – Colores by Patty Rodriguez

This sweet and simple board book introduces colors to kids in the context of the Christmas story. 

The Santero’s Miracle by Rudolfo Anaya
(New Mexico)

This bilingual story takes place in a small village, where Andrés is visiting his grandpa. When a big snow hits, Andres worries his family won’t be able to join them for Christmas. A sweet story of a surprise miracle and family. 

Miracle on 133rd Street by Sonia Manzano

A sweet story about a roast too big to fit into Mami’s oven. What started as a simple cooking problem ends up being an opportunity for the neighborhood to come together and spread the Christmas spirit. 

Twas’ Nochebuena by Roseanne Greenfield Thong

A retelling of The Night Before Christmas that introduces the tradition of Nochebuena, along with Christmas vocabulary in Spanish:

’Twas Nochebuena and all through our casa

every creature was kneading tamale masa

N is for Navidad by Susan Middleton Elya

A bilingual alphabet book that introduces different Latino Christmas traditions and words. 

A Piñata in a Pine Tree by Pat Mora

El Regalo de Navidad by Francisco Jiménez
(US – Immigration Theme)

Renowned author Francisco Jiménez recounts one Christmas from his childhood, the year in which all he wanted was a red ball. His parents explain that they have no money, and are on the constant move. A poignant surprise waits for us in this tale.

El Hombrecito de Mazapán by Louise Martin

The classic tale of the gingerbread boy, told in Spanish. 

A Doll for Navidades by Esmeralda Santiago

The author recounts one childhood Christmas when all she wanted was a doll, in this heartwarming story about love and family. 


 

Welcome

Hey! I’m Elisabeth, a teacher and mom raising two bilingual kids in the Peruvian jungle. Read our story here. I love digging up the best Spanish resources for all you busy parents and teachers!

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A Collection of Day of the Dead Songs

A Collection of Day of the Dead Songs

Inside: The best Day of the Dead Songs, or canciones para Día de Muertos. 

 

With Día de Muertos drawing near, I’ve pulled together a variety of songs to use at home or in the classroom and add this link to my Spanish songs for kids page. These songs may be fun to sing, and the images are a great springboard for discussions about the holiday.

If you’re looking for an entire collections of resources and ideas for Day of the Dead, check out my Día de Muertos activities post as well! I’ve gots lots of links to free resources and ideas for celebrating or teaching traditions. 

 

Day of the Dead Songs for Kids

 

We’ll start off with some options for a younger crowd! These are a mix of traditional songs, and learners songs designed to teach about the holiday.

(Honestly, I am not sure how much I would show with really young kids. It seems like it would be hard to share without lots of English to explain what we are watching, and that some families might be uncomfortable with the graveyard images. However, you know your class and context! I am sharing these so you know your options, and can plan accordingly!)

 

Los Esqueletos – Chumbala

 

I like this one for the very clear singing voice, and the graphics are sweet too. (It works in telling time too, by describing what they do the night of Día de Muertos.) Though it portrays the calaveras in a whimsical way, the graveyard backyard might be scary. 

 

Las Calaveras – Chumbala

 

Another version of Chumbala, with slight different lyrics. 

 

 

Día de los Muertos

 

This song from Rockalingua is an introduction to Día de Muertos — the date, location, activities, etc. The music slogs a little, but still comprehensible and the graphics are useful when working with kids. 

 

El Día de Los Muertos

 

Another comprehensible Day of the Dead song for introducing what the day is about, the graphics here are also helpful for teaching. I didn’t love the music itself, and feel like it doesn’t coincide with the cultural context of the holiday. 

 

Tumbas Por Aquí Tumbas Por Allá

 

This one is a littler creepier, and sort’ve falls under the Halloween category too. 

 

 

Recuérdame – Coco

 

How could I not include music from Coco? Here are two different version, both of which includes scenes from the movie. 

 

Day of the Dead Songs for Teens or Adults

 

Here are some options for older students or adults as well!

 

Calaverita – La Santa Cecilia

 

This is a Day of the Dead classic: a lively song with a comprehensible chorus. Kara Jacobs has some fantastic resources that go with this song too! Just a heads up that Donald Trump appears briefly in one scene– this was before he was elected president, but it may feel political for some.

 

Recuérdame – Natalia Lafourcade

 

I love this re-mix of Recuérdame from Natala Lafourcade. It includes scenes from Coco, mixed in with scenes of Lafourcade singing and Day of the Dead contexts. Really lovely, folksy version that includes lyrics. 

 

La Llorona – Natalia Lafourcade

 

A traditional Mexican folk song, this is not exactly a Day of the Dead song, but it fits in with themes of death, and the afterlife. This story is difficult for me to hear or teach (rooted in a story of a jilted woman who drowns her children and then forever after haunts her former lover and weeps for her children), so be aware of that if you use this. 

 

 

Cumbia de los Muertos – Ozomatli

 

In a totally different musical genre, here’s a cumbia twist on Día de Muertos with some reggae thrown in. It also includes an English portion. (I’ve included two version below.)

 

 

 

Day of the Dead Songs

Welcome

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Happy Birthday Songs in Spanish

Happy Birthday Songs in Spanish

Inside: Different versions Happy Birthday songs in Spanish, on YouTube.

In English, the song Happy Birthday is a staple at any birthday celebration– and wherever you go, it will basically sound the same. In Spanish, however, there are different versions, and they vary by country as well.

Here in Peru, for example, you’d better be prepared if you’re the cumpleañero! You’ll be sung at least three different songs, including Happy Birthday in English, before you get to blow those candles out. Though you say feliz cumpleaños to directly wish someone a Happy Birthday in Spanish, the words get switched to cumpleaños feliz in most cases, to fit the cadence of the song.

 

I’ll share several ways to sing to someone on their birthday, and you can pick your favorite. I wish there were a good version with lyrics on YouTube to recommend for free, but the pickings are slim. If you have more suggestions, let me know in the comments below for sure. 

If you are a classroom teacher, and would like to have quick, nice version with lyrics for your students to follow, you may want to look into this $5 version from Minute by Minute Spanish, which includes several regional options. 

 

If you prefer just to sing without music, here are the lyrics to some simple versions:



Cumpleaños, feliz,

Cumpleaños, feliz,
Cumpleaños feliiiiz,
Cumpleaños feliz.


Cumpleaños feliz
Te deseamos a ti
Que los cumplas feliz
Cumpleaños feliz



Cumpleaños, feliz,

Cumpleaños, feliz,
Te deseamos todos,
Cumpleaños feliz.


 

Happy Birthday Songs in Spanish

 

Let’s get started on our tour of Feliz Cumpleaños songs in YouTube, with option for kids to adults!

 

1. Cumpleaños Feliz with Lyrics

 

*Update!!* An awesome reader just sent me this link, which actually does show the lyrics during the song. WIN!

Cumpleaños feliz,
Cumpleaños feliz,
Te deseamos todos,
Cumpleaños feliz.

 

2. Cumpleaños Feliz – Canción Infantil

This one has a nice audio of children singing, though the images are a bit outdated!

Cumpleaños feliz,
Te deseamos a ti, 
Que los cumplas felices,
Cumpleaños feliz. 

 

3. Happy Birthday – Spanish Version

 

A slower version, sung by adults. Here are the lyrics:

Cumpleaños feliz,
Te deseamos a ti, 
Que los cumplas en tu día,
Que los cumplas feliz. 

 

 

4. Cumpleaños Feliz en Español

 

The graphics and lyrics are great in this version, though the audio is a little hard to sing along to.

Cumpleaños feliz,
Cumpleaños feliz,
Te deseamos todos,
Cumpleaños feliz.

 

5. Las Mañanitas

 

Work in some beautiful, cultural music with Las Mañanitas, traditionally sung on birthdays in Mexico and other Spanish-speaking places. 

 

And with lyrics:

6. Cumpleaños Feliz – Kids Songs

 

This one *does* show the lyrics, but unfortunately also show wine on the table! You may still want to use the audio, so here are the lyrics:

Cumpleaños feliz,
Cumpleaños feliz,
Te deseamos todos,
Cumpleaños feliz.

 

7. Festeja Tu Cumpleaños

 

Another version that sings Que los cumplas feliz, mixed in with an original version from Plim Plim.

 

8. Cumpleaños Feliz – Tambor Urbano

 

 

9. Feliz Cumpleaños

 

An original mix from Toobys. If you introducing vocabulary related to birthday, it includes words like pastel, globos, velitas, regalos, etc. 

 

10. Rompe La Piñata – Dale, Dale, Dale

 

You could also include traditional songs that are sung for the piñata part of a birthday party.

 

 

 

And just for fun– a bonus video poking fun and how long it take to sing all the songs in most countries! Maybe not for class, but a funny watch:

 

 

Do you know of any good Happy Birthday songs in Spanish that I missed? Let me know in the comments!

Like it? Pin it!

Happy Birthday Songs in Spanish

Welcome

Hey! I’m Elisabeth, a teacher and mom raising two bilingual kids in the Peruvian jungle. Read our story here. I love digging up the best Spanish resources for all you busy parents and teachers!

Spanish Mama Newsletter

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