German Children’s Songs: A YouTube Playlist for Beginners

German Children’s Songs: A YouTube Playlist for Beginners

Inside: German children’s songs: some introductory German music on YouTube, for learners. 

 

Let’s state the obvious: I don’t speak German, or know much about it!. However, I am working on a world music collection for Multicultural Kid Blogs and got some suggestions for German songs from our MKB community. So I’m including their suggestions, as well as a few more, to help parents looking for German children’s songs.

If you are looking for other music collections, I have a post on songs in French for kids, and well as an extensive list of songs in Spanish for kids

 

German Children’s Songs

Special thanks to The European Mama and Erin at Large. If you have some more ideas to help me out, I would really appreciate it!

 

1. Fünf kleine Fische

 

 

2. Grün, grün, grün sind alle meine Kleider

 

 

3. Was müssen das für Bäume sein

 

 

4. Alle meine Entchen

 

 

5. ABCs in German

 

If you click on this song, you can also access songs for each letter of the alphabet. 

 

6. Numbers 1-10 in German

 

 

7. Day of the Week in German

 

 

8. Greetings Songs in German 

 

 

Some support for understanding the song above:

 

Did I miss one of your favorite German children’s songs? Please let me know in the comments!

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German Children's Songs

French Songs for Kids: A Playlist for Beginners

French Songs for Kids: A Playlist for Beginners

Inside: A collection of French songs for kids on YouTube. 

 

As we raise our two bilingual kids, I’ve always planned to introduce a third or even fourth language. While this has always been the goal, I’ve been pretty spotty on following through. My son is super interested in French, and my goal this fall is to be more consistent with that. 

always recommend songs for parents wanting to teach their kids Spanish. It’s the perfect way to pick up pronunciation, remember words, and hear language in context.

I created a huge collection of songs in Spanish for kids, but haven’t found something similar for French. So here goes step 1: creating a YouTube playlist! 

We don’t want to set our kids loose on YouTube, and I don’t want him just listening to random songs. Here’s my collection of what we’ll be using as we started!

 

French Songs for Kids on YouTube

 

1. French Greeting Songs

 

Greetings are a good place to start as we learn to introduce ourselves and say hello. I like “French Greetings Song for Children” (also introduces numbers) and “Bonjour, Bonjour.”

 

 

 

2. French Colors Song

 

This one is nice for just learning each color word:

 

3. French Numbers Song

 

We’ve definitely learned 1-10 after a few listens!

 

 

 

 

4. French Alphabet Songs

 

More lighthearted than most on this list, Yo no sé mañana speaks to the uncertainty of new love with an upbeat salsa tone.

 

 

 

5. French Songs to Learn About the Family

 

 

 

 

 

6. French Songs for Parts of the Body

 

 

 

 

7. French Folk Songs for Kids 

 

Frère Jacques

 

Au Clair de la Lune

 

Nous n’irons plus as bois

 

 

What would you add? I am NOT a French speaker, and would love to hear your suggestions! Let me know in the comments!

 

Common Spanish Verbs & Words You Need to Know

Common Spanish Verbs & Words You Need to Know

Inside: Common Spanish verbs every Spanish learner needs to know, and a guide for parents teaching Spanish.  

The Spanish language has a lot of words. It’s impossible to calculate exactly how many, but the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española (DRAE) contains about 93,000. Don’t worry, though! There’s good news for Spanish learners: only a tiny percentage of those words make their way into daily conversation.

I’m going to give a brief intro explaining why high-frequency is a better way of thinking than by “difficulty” or only themed lists. If you are here to see my lists of high-frequency Spanish verbs and words, click here to jump directly to them. 

This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for your support!

Today’s post is for any Spanish language learner, but I’m actually writing fro parents. Many parents tell me they want to learn Spanish with their kids (or teach it to them), but they’ve forgotten their high school Spanish or never studied it. If that’s you, this post was written with you in mind!

The secret to effective, communicative language lessons is focusing on high-frequency structures. One problem with mainstream textbooks and programs is that they teach by themes, and introduce by “difficulty.” This means you could go half a year in Spanish before learning how to express I have or I like. Many of you probably took classes like this. You might have “learned” the word scarf before you could express liking or having something.

 

Themes aren’t all bad. The problem is when you try to learn every word in a theme–like stepsister and great-grandfather— even if they are sort of obscure. You’ll probably just forget them!

Here’s the solution: zero in on the core of the language: common Spanish verbs and phrases. Learn just mom, dad, sister, brother, as a beginner. You’ll pick up more specific, less frequent terms later. 

And — when you learn high-frequency phrases– you’ll more quickly have access to authentic Spanish books, songs, and materials. Why? Because they’re more likely to show up, of course!

So instead of thinking in terms moving through a sequence of “difficulty” and boxed “themes,” think in terms of frequency: starting at the core, and slowing expanding outward to absorb less-common words. Begin with the words you need to be understood, as a beginner, and eventually you’ll be expressing yourself more precisely. 

 

 

 

If you are trying to self-educate a bit, here are some helpful links. None are as ideal and having a teacher, but you can use these resources at home, for free. 

Teach Yourself Spanish, with Free Online Resources

Load Up Podcasts in Spanish

Make a playlist of Songs that use High-Frequency Phrases

Order learner books like these examplesl(novels that use high-frequency words– made for teens, but fun reads!):

 

  

 

Now, let’s get started with our high-frequency lists! You can download all of them as a PDF by clicking below:

Spanish High Frequency Phrases and Verbs PDF

Spanish High Frequency Phrases and Verbs PNGs

Common Spanish Verbs

Spanish verbs are very complicated, especially if you set out to memorize all the endings and mathematical-like rules. You might be able to get them into your short-term memory that way, but here we are focusing on daily communication.

Instead, focus on what you want to say.Ser” (to be) is a messy verb. As you start out though, all you *really* need to know is how to express core phrases like is, I am, you are, etc. It’s how 2-year-olds begin, and reach fluency without knowing how to conjugate!

Here I’ve gathered 11 high-frequency verbs in Spanish, plus gustar (it’s essential when teaching kids.) I only included the he/she/it forms, along with I and you underneath. Eventually, you’ll acquire the forms for we, they, and you all, but these are the basics. When you are ready, the past tense forms are included as well. 

I made a Quizlet sets so you can access the pronunciation on each word:

Present Tense Verbs

 

Common Spanish Words

Here are some of the top Spanish words you’ll need to know as you get startedEspecially with words like these, memorizing them out of context is probably the slowest path to acquiring them. They are most memorable when read and heard in context.

But if you’re trying to work Spanish into your daily life, you’ll need to use these! First, you can see a list of core questions phrases. If you are teaching and reading books in Spanish with your kids, it’s very helpful to know how ask. Work them into daily life as you point out things during the day. 

For pronunciation help and clarification of use, here’s are Quizlet sets I’ve made:

Phrases for Parent and Families

Common Words / Question Words

This Quizlet set also uses most of the phrases I’ve shared

 

 

Common Spanish Phrases for Parents

 

If you would like to work some Spanish into daily routines and family life, here are some core phrases that you can post and begin to use right away. If you use phrases in context and attached to an action (Come here!), you’ll be amazed how much they stick!

 

More Lists

 

If you want more phrases, here are some more! I’m also sharing some Spanish-only lists, if that’s more helpful to you. 

 

Spanish Classrooms Tour: A Peek into 25+ Rooms

Spanish Classrooms Tour: A Peek into 25+ Rooms

Inside: A peek into dozens of Spanish classrooms, of all kinds, shapes, and sizes!

 

A well-designed room won’t make or break your teaching. Oh, but it can make a difference in how you and your students feel. 

Some of you have very limited options, and very tight budgets. I hope this post isn’t a Pinterest-y guilt-inducing post (there’s some serious classroom eye-candy, for sure), but a way to get new ideas for making your space functional and beautiful. 

If you are here looking for something specific, this post is long. Click on the titles if you’d like to jump to the following

Middle and High School

Preschool and Elementary

Spanish Classroom Libraries

 

And I have to say– as I put together this post, I was reminded of the eagerness of our nation’s teachers to share with other teachers (thank you to each and everyone who shared pictures!!), and how much they keep in mind the wellbeing of their students. More than perfection, I think this collection of photos communicate how much teachers care about their students.

Many spent their own money to buy comfortable chairs and build classroom libraries. Those August nights and weekends spent cutting out letters for bulletin boards and hammering together shelves probably went unpaid. You all are a special group of people!

 

 

 

And this one: “Altar de muertos dedicado a uno de los estudiantes que perdió la vida en un accidente el año pasado.”

Credit: Alicia Chávez Bartlett

 

Middle and High School Spanish Classrooms

 

We’ll start with picture from upper school classrooms across the nation. A lot of the rooms feature flexible seating, classroom libraries, or are even deskless.

 

Awesome Flexible Seating

 

I don’t even know what these chairs are called, but I know they’ve got to be popular. Amy Marshall’s classroom and blog are pretty classy and fun-looking. #iwantthesechairs 

 

Piñata-Land

 

I’ve never been able to hand things from the ceiling (darn fire code!), but this is what I would love to do if I could. How amazing are these hanging piñatas from Jenny Robbins’ classroom?

 

 

Group Work Heaven

 

Check out these amazing tables– so many possibilities in this Spanish classroom, from Alison Clausing. 

 

 

And Señora Chase has a whole tour of her room you don’t want to miss!

From here, the featured classrooms all have multiple photos. Click the arrows on the photos to see more all of them!

 

Minimalist + Reading Choice

 

I can’t resist the simplicity of this room, allowing for all kinds of options during reading time. It doubles as the art room, too! Gisele says: “I love , love my room but most importantly it serves my students – they love the flexible seating and when we have our FVR days they are allowed to create pods and sit wherever they feel comfortable. That is what matters to me and I am amazed at how much more reading they engage in when they have choices. I have a collection of cushions, rugs, and lounging chairs that they can arrange in “pods” in the classroom. Oddly enough they remind me of forts that children create during playtime.”
Profe: Gisele Conn
Site: Brain Based Learning

 

Deskless + Rainbow theme

 

See what it looks like to nail the black and rainbow look, with a library corner to die for. She keeps her classroom deskless, which is key for her famous baile viernes days!
Profe: Allison Weinhold
Site: Mis Clases Locas

 

Making a Mobile Work

 

This classroom is proof that you can take a portable and still make it look awesome, with plenty of culture too. 
Profe: Luis Miguel Ramírez, Liberal Arts & Science Academy – Austin, TX
Site: proferamirez.weebly.com

 

Pink + Llamas

 

This is what happens when your Spanish teacher is a Peruvian fashionista. Follow Sra. Davila-Madwid on Instagram for more teaching ideas and classroom eye candy!
Profe: Mariza Davila-Madwid

 

Teaching to Proficiency

 

Profe Jen Shaw works hard to teach to proficiency, and uses the CHAMPS method in her room. You can see how her decor and visuals make those goals clear to her students, while providing a pretty workspace.
Blog: Spanish with Sra. Shaw

 

Floor Envy

 

I don’t know what I’m more in love with: the floors, or the bookshelves in this deskless classroom. 
Profe: Mary Overton

 

Bright Spaces

 

Please come do my bulletin boards? Also, you must check out this organized teacher desk, coffee pot included. #yesplease
Profe: Carla Pelizarri

 

That IG Board, Though

This room is packed with books and culture, but I have to say my favorite part are the Instagram boards featuring Spanish-speaking artists. So clever and pretty!
Profe: Sara Glasbrenner
Site: TPRS with Señorita Glasbrenner

 

Cactus + Watercolor Classroom

Adorable. Says Maestra_Cutshall: “I am SO in love with my cactus-themed classroom this year! I was pretty sad about being in a portable classroom, but I’m now so cozy in our wood paneling, and I can’t imagine how I lived without all the storage (in a non-functioning bathroom hidden behind the shower curtains 😂.)”
Profe: Maestra_Cutshall
Instagram: @maestra_cutshall

 

#Mood

 

Though the tables have since been removed, you can still get the comfy vibe. I love the hanging flags and giant cushions.
Profe: Carrie Daniels Toth
Blog: Somewhere to Share

 

Rows to Circle

 

Here’s a small classroom that went from rows of tables to a circle of flexible seating. Make sure you see the posters on best work and the proficiency bulletin board.  
Profe: Karen Skinner (on Twitter as @senoraskinner)
Blog: The Authentic Señora

 

Immersed in Culture

 

These amazing walls are filled with art and culture (and I’m particularly partial to the Peruvian and FC Barcelona themes). 
Profe: Nadia Charcap

 

That Accent Wall Though

 

If you are allowed to paint, a bold color like this blue (with a gray wall and black accent around) can really make your room feel more homey and less institutional-like.
Profe: Emma Jones Cox
Twitter and IG: @emmaindilemma

 

Bright Colors + Real Life

 

Miss_maestra says, “Here are photos of my classroom from today (messes and all). I absolutely love my classroom and I always have fun decorating it each year. My classroom looked nothing like this my first year. It takes time to get to this point and I’m happy with it.” It’s nice for new teachers to hear that these things take time!
Profe: Miss_maestra
Instagram: @miss_maestra

 

Sillas, Sillas

 

I really liked the set up of these chairs (I’m guessing the lounge-ish chairs are reserved as rewards) and the nice open space are perfect for storytelling and acting in this TPRS classroom. I feel like you would have everyone’s attention with this set-up!
Profe: Michele Metcalfe
Twitter: @michellewestvan

 

Book-Centered Space

 

Books take the center stage here, as well as eye-catching posters for high-frequency verbs and phrases. Don’t miss the genius hoteléfono! 
Profe: Matt Hotopp

 

High Ceilings

 

I know some of us teach with low ceilings, so this feels like a breath of fresh air and posters take advantage of the extra space. I want the shower curtain (I think?) map on the wall too! 
Profe: Tana Luptak

 

Papel Picado

 

Have your students spend a period making papel picado, and you’ve got that festive and good-vibes feeling right away. (And check out the way some of the chairs are turned, so it’s not all rows.)
Profe: Katrina Miller Cox

 

Chair Heaven

 

Talk about flexible seating: this room has a little of everything! The library corner is irresistible and I just want to see what it looks like with all the Christmas lights on. 
Profe: Kristy Vernon (questions? kristy.vernon@wolfcreeklocal.org)

 

An Itty-Bitty Space

 

This is my room from a long time ago. Another class met in my room, so I never got to try deskless. The posters since got covered with high-frequency verbs too. 
Profe: Elisabeth Alvarado

 

Semi-circle Goodness

 

Sometimes, something simple like rearranging the chairs into a semi-circle instead of rows gives that feeling of community and communication. I really like those clean + pretty back bulletin boards too. 
Profe: Mayra Cabrera

 

 

Preschool & Elementary Spanish Classrooms

 

Now  we can start our tour of classrooms for younger crowds. I didn’t get as many pictures for this category, so please send me more at spanishmamatpt@gmail.com, if you have more. 🙂

 

Credit: Irma Vasquez, My Escuelita: Spanish for Kids

 

 

 

Room to Move

 

I love these clever bags that go on the backs of the chairs so you don’t need desks. There is so much room for movement! 
Profe: Carolina Gomez
Blog: Fun for Spanish Teachers

 

Blues and Greens

 

These blue tables are adorable AND double as chalkboards!
Profe: Jeanette Miranda-Gould

 

Happy Place

 

I love the cheerful yellow in this elementary classroom. 
Profe: Karla

 

Snapshots

 

I also was sent photos of specific posters, bulletin boards, or parts of rooms. Browse these for more ideas!

 

Spanish Classroom Libraries

 

A few of these images are repeats from above, but I wanted to have a whole section devoted to class libraries and hacks for storing books. Here’s what I’ve collected so far!

 

 

Marta Ruíz Yedinak

 


Anonymous

 

Matt Hotopp

Matt Hotopp

 

Credit: Mis Clases Locas

Credit: Gisele Conn

 

Credit: Blair Chalker Brown

 

 

 

 

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Spanish Parts of the Body Songs for Kids

Spanish Parts of the Body Songs for Kids

Inside: Spanish parts of the body songs: a list for kids on YouTube.

 

Here are my favorite songs for learning the parts of the body in Spanish. There are lots of games that work well with this theme, too, like Simón dice. Once your classes know the basic parts of the body, brain breaks are super easy to do! Give commands like “tócate la cabeza” or “cierra los ojos,” and stay in the target language more easily. 

 

Spanish Parts of the Body Songs

 

1. A mi burro

 

This authentic song in Spanish includes some body parts (cabeza, cuello, corazón) . It also repeats “le duele” a lot, if you’re teaching how to express that something hurts. 

 

 

2. Cabeza, hombros, rodillas y pies

 

Most kids already know this one in English, and it’s a fun one to teach as the pace gets faster and faster. 

 

 

3. Saco una manito

 

To learn about hands, this is a sweet classic. It’s nice to use right before story time or circle time when we want everyone sitting with hands in their own space!

 

 

4. Todo mi cuerpo

 

These lyrics are similar to “cabeza, hombros, rodillas, pies,” but with more high frequency parts. As always with Calico Spanish, the song is easy to understand. 

 

 

5. Baila la cumbia

 

Get in some culture with this fun mix of cumbia and body parts!

 

spanish body parts songs

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